2020 Weed Pick-Up – Barging Policy – Plants Must Be Free Of Trash!

It is OLMD policy regarding collection of aquatic plants from landowners that all plants for pick up MUST be placed on the end of the pier. This placement facilitates pick up, avoids damage to the hull of the barge on shoreline obstructions (i.e., rocks) and allows the employees to safely transfer the plant material to the barge. Recently some landowners have placed plants to be picked up on rocks at the shoreline to avoid discoloration of their pier. OLMD employees will not be allowed to risk their safety and personal injury to traverse rocky shoreline areas while carrying pitchforks to retrieve the weeds. It is imperative that the plants be placed on the end of the pier for pick-up.
Plants will be picked up during the week from piers in the sections being cut on a particular day and every Monday and Friday, weather permitting. Please check the OLMD website home page at www.olmd.org frequently to review the updated cutting schedule.
Plants must be free of any trash, such as cans, tree limbs, leaves, etc., because the farmers who receive the plant material will not accept anything except plants.
In the rare event plants must be on the shoreline, they must be in one pile in a location allowing the employees to easily transfer the plants directly to the barge. Please note adequate space is required between piers, boat-lifts, etc. to safely maneuver the barge to the pick-up point (20 feet minimum). If, in the opinion of the Lake Operations Manager (and after discussion with the riparian owner), these conditions are not met, the Commission’s policy is to refuse pick up of plant material until the above conditions have been met.
If you have any questions, please call 262-966-0286.

Spring 2020 Muskrat Control Program Update

Arnold Groehler, Animal Damage Control Trapper, started trapping at the beginning of April and will continue into mid-May. Should you see muskrat activity along your shoreline and want them removed, contact Arnold Groehler directly (262-490-9363 jmgroehler@aol.com). Any OLMD residents with an active muskrat burrow should place a flag near the burrow on their property so he can easily identify the burrows as he navigates the lake. If permission was granted for past Muskrat Control programs, a new permission form IS NOT required. If you are new to the program, forms granting permission to access your shoreline can be found on the “Forms” page of this website. Thank you!

Starry Stonewort Update – 10-10-19

On September 27, 2019, the Okauchee Lake Management District application for chemical treatment of the aquatic invasive species, Starry Stonewort, found in two defined areas on the lake, was denied by DNR Senior Water Resources Management Specialist, Heidi Bunk. The letter of denial offered two substantive reasons for its position:

1. The Starry Stonewort populations at the bridge near Foolery’s and near the launch at the
Golden Mast are not currently presenting material obstruction to navigation.

2. The treatment proposed by OLMD was claimed not to have been shown effective to control
Starry Stonewort.

The Okauchee Lake Management Commission has asked for reconsideration of this decision. This is based on advice from our experts that the treatment proposed by OLMD, a combination of Cutrine Ultra-Hydrothol 191 has, indeed, been shown to be effective both locally and in studies conducted elsewhere. (Continued on the “Reports” page.)

Please continue to the “Reports” page and locate “Starry Stonewort Update – 10-10-19” to view the entire post and access links. Thank you!

UPDATE ON STARRY STONEWORT AND OKAUCHEE LAKE – 9-20-19

As those of you who went to the August 26, 2019 Okauchee Lake Management District Annual Meeting know, Starry Stonewort, an aggressive aquatic invasive species plant, has been identified in two small areas on the lake: near the bridge between the channel and Little Okauchee, and near the Golden Mast in the channel. At the Annual Meeting, Commissioners informed residents that aggressive action would be taken to eradicate Starry Stonewort and to keep it from spreading. If this invasive species is allowed to spread, it will aggressively out-compete other aquatic plants in Okauchee Lake and potentially choke off navigation lanes, particularly in shallow areas.
OLMD Commissioners have worked with Kathy Aron, a marine biologist at Aron & Associates, and Brian Suffern, of Marine Biochemists, the organization that chemically treated Okauchee Lake and many of the lakes in this area for decades, to identify and propose treatment options to the DNR. The first option was to treat the Starry Stonewort aggressively in the very small areas in which its been found. This first option included the use of chemicals not currently within the existing OLMD permit that are believed to have little or no effect on native plant life, but have been shown to be effective on the treatment of Starry Stonewort. The DNR lake biologist assigned to Okauchee Lake confirmed the populations of Starry Stonewort, concluded that chemical treatment on other lakes was not effective and further, suggested that the proposed chemical option might stress certain native species. Despite the DNR’s lake biologist admitting that it did not kill those other native species, the application for chemical treatment was denied.
OLMD consultant, Kathy Aron suggested that allowing the Starry Stonewort to continue, without treatment, would not result in it being outcompeted by other plant species as suggested by the DNR, based on her own experience with Starry Stonewort on Wind Lake. Further, since she was well acquainted with the treatment on Wind Lake, which the DNR said was ineffective, she recognized that the DNR that had delayed treatment from one year to the next, allowing Starry Stonewort to spread, and apparently the DNR has not recognized that had Wind Lake been able to use chemical treatment to control Starry Stonewort in two navigational channels, just as the OLMD wants to do, the results would be far better.
OLMD Commissioner Dennis Johnson, in charge of the OLMD Aquatic Plant Management Plan, has appealed this decision to deny use of chemical treatment for Starry Stonewort and has asked the DNR for reconsideration. In the meantime, the OLMD is attempting to reach out to Legislators and others to see if there is a more aggressive and promising solution than the “wait and see” attitude adopted by the DNR.

Informational Meeting About Starry Stonewort – October 12 from 1-3pm at the Delafield Town Hall

There will be an informational meeting on October 12th from 1 pm to 3 pm at the Delafield Town Hall: W302N1254 Maple Avenue, Delafield, WI 53018. The meeting is primarily for the residents of the Nemahbin Lakes, Pewaukee Lake, and Okauchee Lake, but all are welcome to attend. There will be a presentation going over the ecology and identification of Starry Stonewort, as well as current control efforts, results, and what the next steps are in regards to the management of this species. The Town of Delafield has requested that in place of payment for the venue that all attendees bring an item to donate to the local food pantry. The following items have been requested: Canned soups, canned vegetables, canned meat, canned fruit.
Please visit the Waukesha County AIS webpage at: www.waukeshacounty.gov/AIS to learn the latest information about this species!

A Special Announcement From AIS Coordinator, Cassie Taplin About Starry Stonewort

As you may already be aware, Starry Stonewort, an aggressive aquatic invasive plant, has recently been found in area lakes, including Okauchee Lake, Pewaukee Lake, and Lower Nemahbin. The stands of Starry Stonewort have been monitored and a series of surveys have begun in working toward finding the correct treatment option for the lakes. Identification information and survey/treatment options are included in the full announcement located on the Waukesha County AIS webpage at: www.waukeshacounty.gov/AIS.

Starry Stonewort Found In Okauchee Lake – Please Clean Your Boat, Trailers and Watercraft!

Starry Stonewort is an aggressive aquatic invasive plant that forms dense mats of weeds and chokes out native species. It is spread by the “stars” that grow on the plant. Small fragments of the plant containing a starry bulbil can begin a new stand. These fragments can easily be tucked away in live wells, trailers and any water remaining on a watercraft as a boater moves from lake to lake. Please exercise caution and common sense in moving about the lake to avoid any treatment activity going on in the lake and upon removal of watercraft for the season. More information will be posted to this website as it becomes available. Detailed information about the Starry Stonewort plant is available on the “Reports” page.